Greek Referendum: selfishness trumps responsibility; ideology trumps reality

There was a logical reason for Greeks to vote NO in their Referendum: if they genuinely believed that an exit from the Euro and return to their own currency was the best way forward. It’s fraught with risk, but is a viable solution. It’s also a very possible (some would say probable) consequence of the NO vote and therefore necessary to consider. Instead, the celebrations in Greece by those who voted against the proposal under consideration seem to be either vested in a belief they have backed Europe into a corner or based on ideology rather than practical reality.

It’s all very well for the Greeks to be crowing about their democratic rights. But becoming part of the Eurozone was always a compromise: a more stable currency, freedom of movement and greater prospect of investment in exchange for collectivity rather than simple sovereignty. Greece, like every other country that joined the Euro, knew this.
Continue reading “Greek Referendum: selfishness trumps responsibility; ideology trumps reality”

Advertisements
Greek Referendum: selfishness trumps responsibility; ideology trumps reality

TV & HCV (or Aussie TV Series Wentworth & the Hepatitis C Virus)

The new season (3) of the TV Series Wentworth has a story-line around the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV).

For those unaware, Wentworth is a critically acclaimed Australian TV Series on Foxtel’s Soho Channel about a women’s prison. It draws its inspiration from the groundbreaking 1980s Australian TV Series Prisoner. The emphasis is important: the deliberately confronting and challenging nature of this series (and its predecessor) means complex, and often otherwise ignored, issues are at the core of its storytelling.

The HCV story arc began Continue reading “TV & HCV (or Aussie TV Series Wentworth & the Hepatitis C Virus)”

TV & HCV (or Aussie TV Series Wentworth & the Hepatitis C Virus)

Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty

Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran’s executions in Indonesia last week have naturally led to a debate about the AFPs involvement in the original arrest of the Bali 9 and what position should be taken in future. Much of this debate has centred around the acceptability in the context of the specific circumstances. The Bali 9 were bringing heroin to Australia, which most Australians find repugnant and which would potentially have led to the deaths of a number of Australians (plus the misery of many more). The AFP’s choice to provide information to the Indonesian National Police (INP) is then referenced to that, making it easier to excuse, tolerate or even endorse. However, the AFP’s actions should be seen independently of the Bali 9’s and more weight should be given to Australia’s stance on the death penalty.
Continue reading “Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty”

Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty