Why Schapelle Corby doesn’t deserve our sympathy

In the lead up to and throughout her return to Australia, Schapelle Corby and her family have pleaded for privacy and criticised the media circus surrounding her.

Someone needs to contact Oxford University Press to insert a photo of Schapelle and her family under the definition of “hypocrisy”.

Continue reading “Why Schapelle Corby doesn’t deserve our sympathy”

Advertisements
Why Schapelle Corby doesn’t deserve our sympathy

The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0

When news about Cassie Sainsbury’s arrest in Colombia for drug trafficking first attracted media attention, social media laughingly tagged her “Corby 2.0”. Though many parallels can be drawn, it was the attention-seeking nature of her and her family’s pleas for assistance that most starkly resembled Schapelle and her family back in 2004. But last night, “Corby 2.0” went from being a joke to reality when Channel 9’s 60 Minutes  and Channel 7’s Sunday Night went head to head with “exposes” on the mysterious, inconsistent and questionable stories around how Cassie ended up with 5.8kgs of cocaine in her luggage at El Dorado Airport in Bogota.

Both stories had interesting nuggets of information. On Sunday Night, her father revealed that she had mentioned a trip to Bogota back in January, which he advised against. There is no communication between members of her family: her fiance has not communicated with her mother and sister, and nobody has contacted her father. Colombian officials and experts on their drug trade provided insight into her situation and the consequences she may now be facing. However, what is consuming the most media attention and discussion today is the revelation that Cassie worked as a sex worker prior to her excursion around the globe to Colombia.

Continue reading “The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0”

The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0