The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0

When news about Cassie Sainsbury’s arrest in Colombia for drug trafficking first attracted media attention, social media laughingly tagged her “Corby 2.0”. Though many parallels can be drawn, it was the attention-seeking nature of her and her family’s pleas for assistance that most starkly resembled Schapelle and her family back in 2004. But last night, “Corby 2.0” went from being a joke to reality when Channel 9’s 60 Minutes  and Channel 7’s Sunday Night went head to head with “exposes” on the mysterious, inconsistent and questionable stories around how Cassie ended up with 5.8kgs of cocaine in her luggage at El Dorado Airport in Bogota.

Both stories had interesting nuggets of information. On Sunday Night, her father revealed that she had mentioned a trip to Bogota back in January, which he advised against. There is no communication between members of her family: her fiance has not communicated with her mother and sister, and nobody has contacted her father. Colombian officials and experts on their drug trade provided insight into her situation and the consequences she may now be facing. However, what is consuming the most media attention and discussion today is the revelation that Cassie worked as a sex worker prior to her excursion around the globe to Colombia.

Continue reading “The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0”

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The sex work is a red herring, but Cassie Sainsbury really is Schapelle Corby 2.0

Myuran and Andrew’s Legacy: Rising Above

In the early hours of tomorrow morning it will be a year since Indonesia executed Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, who were shot by firing squad along with six other men around 12:30am on 29 April 2015.

Yesterday Indonesian authorities transferred out of Kerobokan the two men Myuran had hand-picked to continue his art, printing and computer rehabilitation programs. Continue reading “Myuran and Andrew’s Legacy: Rising Above”

Myuran and Andrew’s Legacy: Rising Above

Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty

Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran’s executions in Indonesia last week have naturally led to a debate about the AFPs involvement in the original arrest of the Bali 9 and what position should be taken in future. Much of this debate has centred around the acceptability in the context of the specific circumstances. The Bali 9 were bringing heroin to Australia, which most Australians find repugnant and which would potentially have led to the deaths of a number of Australians (plus the misery of many more). The AFP’s choice to provide information to the Indonesian National Police (INP) is then referenced to that, making it easier to excuse, tolerate or even endorse. However, the AFP’s actions should be seen independently of the Bali 9’s and more weight should be given to Australia’s stance on the death penalty.
Continue reading “Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty”

Crime & Punishment: Australia’s values are collateral damage alongside the Bali 9 duo if we don’t stand firm on the death penalty